The South Carolina Environmental Law Project

Lawyers for the Wild Side of South Carolina

SCELP In The News

Proposed industrial park in Bucksport pits environmentalists against developers, neighbor against neighbor
April 14th, 2014

Like the traits and traditions that bind a family’s generations together, the Waccamaw River has etched its place in James Frazier’s family for nearly a century – both giving and taking life while remaining a steadfast friend.

But now, a proposal to build a 195-acre, industrial park along the river at the Bucksport Marina site, has divided this historically black community, putting Frazier at odds with some of his neighbors and environmentalists who are opposed to the plan.

The industrial park, touted by some as a job-creating savior to this economically depressed area, could be home to industries such as yacht manufacturers. It could bring hometown jobs to residents who now commute to Conway or Myrtle Beach to make a living.

Some fear the industrial park, and the dredging needed to create it, could damage the river or bring even more development that might spell an end to Bucksport’s identity.

Frazier – who, at 76 years old come Thursday, is almost as much a part of Bucksport as the river itself – thinks the park is a good idea.

Born and raised in Bucksport, Frazier has represented the community of 876 people on Horry County Council for 31 years, longer than any other council member. The local community center bears his name.

“I’ve always wanted to see something in the community. Always,” he said. “I would be happy to see industry back down there on that river, to tell you the truth.”

Frazier’s life story never strays far from the Waccamaw’s banks.

His great grandmother worked the river’s rice fields for 20 cents a day until she saved enough money to buy six acres of land that remains with her heirs today. Childhood dinners at his grandmother’s house regularly included a fresh catch from the river.

“They had sacks full of fish,” Frazier said. “That’s how we survived, it’s how we survived.”

The river also claimed the life of Frazier’s uncle.

Frazier calls Dec. 24, 1945, the longest day of his life. His uncle, a cousin and his uncle’s best friend decided that day to cross the river to hunt deer for Christmas dinner. Their boat capsized and two of the men never came back.

“Uncle Arthur went down and come up; he had his short boots off,” Frazier said. “But his friend, Jim Henderson, had on hip boots. He went down, his boots got filled and he didn’t come back up. And Uncle Arthur turned around to go help Mr. Jim and they both drowned.”

To Frazier, the river is a constant. And it can take care of itself.

“Don’t worry about the Waccamaw River,” he said. “God put it there. He put the fish in it. It’s going to be there until God goes home, and he ain’t going home.”

Environmentalists’ growing clout

Environmentalists say the industrial park could permanently damage the river Frazier loves, along with its fish and the wildlife around it.

“I certainly respect the comments about God and the Waccamaw River belonging to God,” said Michael Corley, a lawyer with the S.C. Environmental Law Project in Georgetown. “But the Sampit River down in Georgetown, God created that, too, and I dare you to even fish out of there.”

In addition to the Waccamaw River, environmentalists say they worry about impacts to the Waccamaw National Wildlife Refuge – which sits across the river from where the park would be built – and potentially to drinking water. One of Horry County’s major drinking water sources is the Bull Creek intake just south of the planned facility.

“The potential exists for significant impacts to water quality resulting from stormwater runoff, fuel spills and the accidental release of transferred bulk materials into adjacent waters,” said Elizabeth Weems, a spokeswoman for the League of Women Voters in South Carolina. “Lastly, establishment of a bulk cargo and heavy barge transport operations in the Waccamaw River will likely result in future dredging and other shoreline modifications to maintain the facility.”

Such environmental concerns once were held in little regard in Horry County – a place where developers regularly dug long trenches through their property to drain wetlands so more homes and shops could dot the landscape. In recent years, however, environmentalists here have been flexing their muscles.

Last year, they forced state-owned electric utility Santee Cooper to agree to move 1.3 million tons of coal ash from ponds at the Grainger electric plant along the Waccamaw River in Conway. Santee Cooper – one of the developers of the proposed Bucksport industrial park, along with Grand Strand Water & Sewer Authority – had originally planned to leave the coal ash in place at the idled electric plant.

Before that, environmentalists helped force electronics manufacturer AVX Corp. – once this area’s largest private employer – to clean up groundwater in a Myrtle Beach neighborhood that had been polluted with a carcinogenic degreaser.

Their success in delaying construction of I-73 in South Carolina – a highway environmentalists say is unnecessary and would ruin wetlands and rural businesses – has gotten under the skin of politicians and I-73 supporters, who call the environmentalists “anti-progress forces.”

Environmental groups now are targeting the industrial park in Bucksport, questioning the need for the facility and its developers’ plans to dredge about 40,000 cubic yards of material from the Waccamaw River so large commercial vessels can navigate the waters. In addition, developers want to fill one-tenth of an acre of tidal freshwater wetlands with 1,705 cubic yards of material to construct a bulkhead.

The S.C. Department of Health and Environmental Control is reviewing a permit application for the dredging and recently requested additional information about the project from its developers, according to agency spokesman Jim Beasley. It is not clear when a final decision on the application will be handed down.

Environmentalists have asked DHEC to put the permit application on hold and force developers to conduct an environmental impact study for their project. Without such a study, DHEC cannot fulfill its legal obligation to consider the direct and indirect impacts the industrial park could have on the river, said Nancy Cave, north coast director for the Coastal Conservation League.

Beasley said the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers already has decided that no environmental impact study is required, and DHEC has no plans to request one for its review.

The issue ultimately could be decided by a judge. Environmentalists increasingly are using the courts system to force developers and regulators to follow the letter of the law.

“It’s impossible for DHEC to carry out its mandatory duty in following these regulations when so much about this project remains unanswered,” Corley said.

A community in need of jobs

The park’s supporters are pitching the prospects of good-paying manufacturing jobs and a chance to keep this area’s brightest at home rather than having them leave Horry County for suitable work elsewhere. Plans include the construction of new docks and piers, a new road connecting the marina to U.S. 701 and 141 acres leased to industry in parcels ranging from 10 acres to 36 acres apiece.

“This is about quality of life,” said Mark Lazarus, chairman of Horry County Council. “It’s also about jobs, jobs, jobs for this area. We’re all working together for a common cause, for a common good, for the betterment of the people of Horry County.”

Bennie Swans, chairman of the Carolina African Heritage Foundation, said he is “sick and tired of seeing young men in the afternoon, walking around dazed and complaining about jobs.”

“We know that unemployment is a pipeline to prison,” Swans said. “We know that people cannot put a roof over their head or food on the table without a job.”

Although Bucksport’s unemployment rate is comparable to Horry County’s as a whole, the community has a much lower median annual household income – $26,971 in Bucksport compared with $42,183 county-wide – according to the U.S. Census Bureau. More than one-third of Bucksport’s residents live in poverty, according to the U.S. Census Bureau, compared with 18 percent in all of Horry County.

“We’ve got too many of our children who are leaving,” Lazarus said. “We’ve got too many of our children who are getting in trouble for one reason or another because they don’t have any hope in this area. The only way they’re going to have hope is if we create jobs.”

That sounds good to Levon Hicks, a Bucksport resident who has commuted about 12 miles to Conway for 30 years for a job with Spann Roofing.

“I’m for it,” Hicks said of the industrial park. “I would love to see more jobs down here.”

For Corley, however, the promise of new jobs rings hollow.

“We’ve heard some pretty bold claims,” he said. “Hundreds of jobs. Your grandchildren working at this place. Maybe I missed it, but I haven’t seen any proof to back up any of these claims.”

Corley points to a feasibility study paid for by Grand Strand Water & Sewer Authority that appears to downplay the park’s potential for success. That report states that the best manufacturing fit for such a park would be oversized, excessive load cargo that can’t be transported by road or rail.

“How small of a market are we talking about?” Corley said. “Something that’s too large to be transported by roadway or rail and the only viable way to get it around is by water? This report doesn’t identify a single possible manufacturer or a single possible product that fits within that description.”

Such skepticism is short-sighted, according to the industrial park’s supporters.

“There is no other location along the coast of South Carolina that offers what this site offers in terms of boat building opportunities and barging opportunities,” said Barry Jurs, Santee Cooper’s economic development facilities planner. “What else does it offer? Peace and prosperity.”

Industrial park supporters say that in the world of economic development, the “build it and they will come” model is the only one that works.

“The process that one has to go through to build a project like this doesn’t take days or weeks – it takes years,” said Mike Wooten, a civil engineer and president of DDC Engineers Inc. in Myrtle Beach, which has built a half-dozen industrial parks throughout South Carolina. “So when you have the opportunity for an industry that’s coming to the area and they’re looking for a place to be and you tell them, ‘Well, we’ll have one, it’s right there in Bucksport, but it’s going to take us 10 years,’ it doesn’t work that way in today’s environment.”

Doug Wendel, former president of Myrtle Beach developer Burroughs & Chapin Co. Inc. and a member of the Horry County Economic Development Corp.’s board of directors, said “you’ve got to have product” before industry can be recruited.

“Once we get the product, we will go out and we will recruit industry to come in,” he said.

Suspicions and skepticism

Some Bucksport residents say they are wary of outsiders, especially rich, white developers who want to tell them what’s best for their community.

“I’ve seen places where big businesses move in and the blacks move out,” said Donald Gause. “When the dollar moves in, it don’t care where it pushes and shoves.”

Diane Mercier, a Bucksport native whose family ties to that area span generations, said she’s skeptical that any new jobs would go to people in her community.

“The Bucksport community has been told that the industrial park will produce jobs. When and for whom?,” Mercier said. “There have been meetings about the park, but we all go away with no answers, only more confusion. We get words written in the sand, and you know what happens when the tide comes in – the words get washed away.”

The threat of broken promises is a common fear here.

“I’m for anything that enhances the life of the people in Bucksport,” said Leatha Carson, who was born in the community and then returned after a 40-year career in New York with the U.S. Postal Service. “That doesn’t seem to be what happens when developers move into these communities. They bring in jobs and they bring in people to fill those jobs, but the people in the community become invisible.”

Glenn Graham is like many of this community’s residents – open to prospects of an industrial park as long as Bucksport isn’t pushed aside.

“This town has been here a long time,” Graham said, a lifelong resident. “There’s a lot of history here. For someone to come in here and shut us out would be un-American. If you’re going to do it, do it right. But don’t push us out.”

Graham’s aunt, Clara Graham, worries about the environmental impact of the proposed industrial park, and she doesn’t want the higher taxes or increased traffic that could come with an industrial park.

“I’ve lived here all my life,” she said. “I built a home here and raised four children here. I don’t want anything to interfere with my home.”

Development fears return

There also is fear that the industrial park could open the door to widespread development in this mostly rural slice of Horry County, forever altering Bucksport’s nature.

“We’re not against change, but we are concerned about our community,” said Harold Phillips, another born-and-raised Bucksport resident. “We’re not against jobs, but we are concerned about our community. Most of the people here have lived a quiet, peaceful life.”

Bucksport has faced development fears before.

In the early 1990s, a group of wealthy landowners including textile magnate Roger Milliken and E. Craig Wall Jr. – president of Conway-based forest products company Canal Industries Inc. – owned the land where the industrial park is now proposed. They had plans for residential neighborhoods, golf courses and other commercial projects on the property, but those plans were scuttled by opposition to a bridge over Bull Creek that would have linked the property to Sandy Island.

The developers ultimately sold the land – which encompasses 4,464 acres including the proposed industrial park site – to Grand Strand Water & Sewer Authority in 1999.

Cave, with the Coastal Conservation League, and other environmentalists say access to that property could be opened up by a proposed but unfunded road called the Southern Evacuation Lifeline, which would link U.S. 17 Bypass south of Surfside Beach to U.S. 701 via a bridge across the Waccamaw River. Cave and others say the industrial park could be the first step to a bridge linking sleepy Bucksport directly to the bustling Grand Strand.

While developers say there are no plans for a bridge linking Bucksport to the Grand Strand, it’s hard to find a resident here who hasn’t heard the rumors.

“They have to have a bridge,” Cave said. “That’s the only way that land becomes valuable. It would put that property just 10 minutes from the beach.”

Fred Richardson, executive director of Grand Strand Water & Sewer Authority, scoffs at the notion.

Richardson said there are no development possibilities for the property, much less any bridge plans, because the authority is using most of the land for a 10 million-gallon-per-day wastewater plant, a water treatment facility, a large composting facility, a sod farm and other related projects that he said can’t be put anywhere else. Aside from that and land set aside for the industrial park, Richardson said the rest of the property is undevelopable wetlands.

Looking for a middle ground

Lloyd Sherman, a 61-year-old Bucksport resident, has met several times with his neighbors to debate the industrial park’s pros and cons. It was after one of those meetings, Sherman said, that Bucksport’s need for decent jobs became crystal clear.

“It hadn’t been 15 minutes after I stepped out of the meeting that I called my good friend and I said, ‘Fred, I can’t get to my own house,’ ” Sherman said. “He said, ‘What’s the matter?’ A drug shooting. A young man got shot, bullets were flying on down the street and hit my wife. She can’t walk. She’s crippled.”

To Sherman, Bucksport’s future can go one of two ways: “Work, or do you want drugs in the community?”

“We need jobs in Bucksport,” Sherman said. “We need positive things.”

For others, however, nothing can be more positive than good health and a clean environment.

“We want progress, but we do not want the industrial marina park in Bucksport that will pollute our water, pollute the land and damage our health,” Mercier said. “We have the everyday sickness as it is without mankind inducing more sickness on us.”

Frazier, who announced in February that he will run for another four-year term on Horry County Council, hopes eventually to bring the two sides together.

“People ask me how in the name of God have you stayed on that council for 31 years?” Frazier said. “Working with the others who are on the council and working with the people of this great county of ours. You’ve got to work together, whether in church, in homes, in the community anywhere.

If re-elected, Frazier said he hopes to see industrial park move forward before the end of his next term.

“My grandma lived to be 94 years old and she always told us ‘don’t give up the goal unless you have to,’ ” Frazier said. “Hang in there. And that’s what we intend to do.”

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Kiawah River erosion clips Beachwalker Park parking lot; environmentalists ask for new Capt. Sam’s Spit hearing

The eroding bank of the Kiawah River tore a small chunk from the Beachwalker Park parking lot over the weekend — a sign of the fragility of the battled-over environs of Capt. Sam’s Spit.

Meanwhile, the S.C. Environmental Law Project has petitioned the state Supreme Court to rehear the case over a proposed sea wall for a road planned from that parking lot to a proposed 50-home development on the spit. The court rarely rehears cases, and rehearing this one would be even less likely, but it has some chance, a law professor says.

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Proposed Wild Dunes beach erosion fix sparks concerns

A city proposal that could allow digging up truckloads of sand near Dewees Inlet to fight erosion in Wild Dunes has drawn the ire of residents living near the inlet.

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A line in a lot of sand; Seabrook owner disputes re-cutting Capt. Sam’s Inlet

Capt. Sam’s Inlet is the focus of a dispute between property owners on Seabrook Island, one that is working its way through the court system. The argument is about whether or not to recut the inlet, changing the flow of sand down the beach.

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Council approves plans for Pawley's Island shopping center

"Don't Box the Neck"

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Groups file appeal to halt permit for Charleston cruise terminal

A group of neighborhood associations, preservationists and environmentalists are asking state environmental regulators to review a recent approval for a new cruise terminal in downtown Charleston.

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Pawleys Plaza: Planners expect new proposal without big-box store

A new plan for Pawleys Island Plaza will replace a portion of the existing shopping center with a 60,000-square-foot retail space, according to people familiar with the project.

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As state’s wetlands dwindle, South Carolina seeks new answer

In the nearly 12 years since the U.S. Supreme Court eased federal protections on isolated wetlands, swampy South Carolina has talked at length about how to fill the gap and save these wildlife-rich bogs.

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SCELP's Amy Armstrong was recently featured on WIS TV.

Potentially cancer-causing, deadly chemicals in SC water supply

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County Planning staff recommends rezoning for Pawleys Plaza

SCELP is working to fight a proposed big box store from locating in Pawleys Island!

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Supreme Court Wetlands Ruling

Legislators are poised to derail a 2011 S.C. Supreme Court decision that gave extra protection to wetlands and made it easier for the public to sue alleged polluters under state law.

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Marlboro in Fierce Fight Against Landfill

"You'll mess up the water. You can't breathe. And I don't want to look out and see buzzards flying everywhere."

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Captain Sam's Ruling a Win!

Capt. Sam's ruling is a win Monday, November 28, 2011

Even diehard Cowboys fans can celebrate the dolphins' recent big win. The S.C. Supreme Court ruled last week that one of the marine mammals' favorite feeding spots may not be altered by a half-mile concrete sea wall.

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Developer in Battle to Build Near Angel Oak

For five years, the future of a centuries-old live oak tree has been the subject of a heated dispute on Johns Island: whether a new apartment complex will kill the iconic symbol of the Lowcountry.

Angel Oak boosters have waged a small war against developer Robert DeMoura, filing legal challenges and organizing political rallies in the hope of stopping his multi-phase development in Charleston County.

Now, they appear to be winning the battle.

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High Court Rules on Pawleys Island Land Fight

A case involving less than a quarter-acre of land in Pawleys Island has set a new precedent for wetlands protection in South Carolina.

The S.C. Supreme Court ruled 3-2 on Monday that the S.C. Department of Health and Environmental Control has jurisdiction over isolated wetlands, a reversal of the Georgetown County Circuit Court’s ruling and DHEC’s previous operating procedure.

“A landmark decision,’’ said Amy Armstrong, the director of the S.C. Environmental Law Project and a member of the Georgetown County League of Women Voters, which brought the suit against developer Smith Land Co. No one from DHEC was immediately available to comment.

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Fight on to Save Lily Pond Arcadia Lakes; residents oppose dredging

One of the most visible ponds in Richland County, a lake full of lily pads and flowers on Trenholm Road, will be dredged and converted into a storm water basin for an apartment complex. But the plan by a Columbia development company is causing an uproar in normally quiet Arcadia Lakes. The Town Council and 16 residents are going to court next month to try to stop the work at the 1.3-acre lake, which sits just outside the town limits.. Click HERE to read the Article.

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Conservationists applaud long-awaited decision

The S.C. Supreme Court dealt a smashing blow Monday to developers who have tried for years to overturn state rules that safeguard coastal freshwater wetlands from unchecked development. The decision, much anticipated by environmentalists and developers, overturns a 2008 lower-court verdict that declared invalid state rules protecting freshwater wetlands along the coast. Click HERE to read the Article.

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Developer's Claim Gets Hard Look

Thousands of acres of coastal wetlands could lose protection from development if SC Supreme Court sides with a company that plans a commercial project on 62 acres in Murrells Inlet. Click HERE to read the Article.

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Appeal under way to allow Kiawah revetment

COLUMBIA -- Conservationists fought in court today to stop what they see as the first step in the development of 50 homes on an unstable portion of Kiawah Island. Chief Administrative Law Judge Ralph Anderson III heard opening arguments by attorneys for the Kiawah Development Partners, the state Department of Health and Environmental Control and the Coastal Conservation League. The Kiawah developers appealed DHEC's December decision to allow only 10 percent, or 270 feet, of the construction of an erosion barrier. The developers want to build a 2,783-foot bulkhead and revetment to stop erosion next to Beachwalker Park. Click HERE to read the Article.

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Judge Denies Landfill Permit

For close to four years, residents of Gray Court have fought to keep North Carolina-based MRR Highway 92 LLC from building a landfill near their homes in rural Laurens County. After forming a coalition called Engaging and Guarding Laurens County's Environment, their vigorous fight won a significant court battle when an administration law judge rejected a permit to build the new landfill in Gray Court, saying the company proposing the landfill did not sufficiently demonstrate it was needed. Click HERE to read the Article.

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Critics Urge Changes in U.S. 601 Plan through Congaree National Park

The Department of Transportation plans to commence work on rebuilding several bridges on Hwy U.S. 601 through Congaree National Park next year. Critics have been asking DOT to replace more of the existing causeways with bridging to allow the safe passage of wildlife. A public hearing on the project was held on September 8, 2009. Click HERE to read an article on this issue that appeared in The State Newspaper on September 9, 2009.

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Bill Marscher Tribute

Click HERE to view the comic.

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Barnwell leaks worse than feared

Radioactive tritium in groundwater exceeds EPA safe-drinking levels
By SAMMY FRETWELL
sfretwell@thestate.com

SNELLING — Higher-than-expected amounts of a radioactive material are tainting the groundwater at a nuclear waste dump long considered safe by state regulators.

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Underdog lawyer puts up good fight

By SAMMY FRETWELL
sfretwell@thestate.com

Practically everyone in Georgetown knew Jimmy Chandler when he came home for a visit in 1981.

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Sand battle won't blow over

By Bo Petersen (Contact) The Post and Courier

ISLE OF PALMS — The Wild Dunes sandbag fiasco just sank a little deeper. The S.C. Supreme Court on Monday ruled that an island resident has the right to appeal a state permit that allows moving sand from public to private areas.

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Citizens step up to the plate and hit one home in coastal protection case

THE ISLAND PACKET
David Lauderdale
dlauderdale@islandpacket.com
843-706-8115

It didn't get the attention of a MegaMillions lottery, but Lowcountry citizens won big in a recent court ruling.

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Ex-senator liable in bridge lawsuit

By Schuyler Kropf
The Post and Courier

A former state lawmaker who helped write the state's coastal management act has lost a civil suit that accused him of violating it.

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RESIDENTS, LANDOWNERS MADE PARK POSSIBLE

THE SUN NEWS
EDITORIAL PAGE

Author: Jimmy Chandler and Amy Armstrong
Section: LOCAL

The Sun News' Jan. 25 article about the Heritage Shores Nature Park properly highlighted the fact that a small slice of nature has been preserved in the Cherry Grove area of North Myrtle Beach. The city of North Myrtle Beach deserves thanks for the series of boardwalks and trails, two picnic shelters and educational kiosks, as well as boat access to the creeks around Cherry Grove, that the park provides.

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Robert Ariail's Editorial Cartoon on Chem-Nuclear

The State

SCELP would like to thank Robert Ariail for permission to use his (Ariail030407.pdf)[editorial cartoon featuring Chem-Nuclear]. No further comment necessary.

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NMB Opens Nature Park on Marsh

THE SUN NEWS
From staff reports

A dedication ceremony at 11 a.m. Wednesday marked the opening of the Heritage Shores Public Nature Park in the Cherry Grove area of North Myrtle Beach. The park - on 8 acres north of 55th Avenue North and Heritage Drive - has a series of boardwalks, two picnic shelters, boat access to the Cherry Grove marsh, two information kiosks, an observation station and a series of trails about two-thirds of a mile long.

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Congaree bridge permits delayed

By SAMMY FRETWELL sfretwell@thestate.com

Groups say U.S. 601 project will harm wildlife in park

Plans to replace a 58-year-old bridge near Congaree National Park sparked enough questions Thursday that state regulators delayed issuing permits for the work.

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Land-use plan update critical, say residents

By Jesse Tullos, jtullos@gtowntimes.com
The Georgetown Times

Butch Varnadore has heard news reports that say it’s foolish to invest money into new housing developments. He heard those reports about as much as he’s heard the hammering going on across the lake from his home on the Pawleys Island mainland.

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Wetlands bill represents compromise

BY BO PETERSEN

The Post and Courier

Protecting isolated wetlands, a flash point in a regulatory war being fought by conservationists and property-rights proponents, goes to a state Senate committee hearing Wednesday.

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A chance to take part

The Georgetown Times

Several meetings that will be held this month provide an opportunity for county residents to have input on the future, in terms of land-use planning and educational vision.

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With Lowe’s gone for the time being, what have we really accomplished?

The Georgetown Times - Editorials

The Waccamaw Neck community gathered together in an amazing display of public participation in the political process, and was able to stop Lowe’s dead in its tracks. We came out to oppose the project, and we proved that we can have meaningful impact into what our community looks like. If only all planning and zoning decisions were always made this way — with input from the affected public.

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Neighbors claim abuse of power

By Jason Lesley

TIMES MANAGING EDITOR

Citizens gathered at a public hearing at Browns Ferry Elementary School Tuesday called South Carolina’s Central Electric Power Cooperative an arrogant government agency that has used intimidation and half-truths to secure rights-of-way for an 11-mile, 115,000-volt transmission line.

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Judge fines bulkhead owner

NORTH MYRTLE BEACH

By Janelle Frost
The Sun News

A property owner in North Myrtle Beach has been ordered by an administrative law judge to remove a bulkhead, which extended 31 feet into the marsh, and pay a $1,000 administrative fine.

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Seminar discusses erosion

Lawyer: Battles could arise over changing lot sizes

By Kelly Marshall
The Sun News

Environmentalists attending a day-long seminar Wednesday on coastal erosion said more challenges could be coming to the state's beachfront management laws, including a ban on sea walls.

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Sea wall can stay for now

Daufuskie homeowners, state officials settle dispute

BY JESSICA FLATHMANN, The Island Packet

BEAUFORT -- Daufuskie Island homeowners and state officials Tuesday settled a legal challenge to the state's beachfront management law, stopping a trial before it got started.

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Court urged to jettison sea-wall ban

Beaufort County group says barrier needed to protect property

By SAMMY FRETWELL
Staff Writer

Landowners urge court to jettison sea-wall ban.

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State takes public remarks on DeBordieu sand solution

By Erin Reed
The Sun News

PAWLEYS ISLAND - DeBordieu Colony residents who want to take sand from a public inlet and move it to their private beach for renourishment argue they'll only take 2 percent of the sandbar.

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No Public Sand For DeBordieu

EDITORIALS
Mining North Inlet should be unthinkable

There is a heaping chunk of gall in the DeBordieu Colony's request that the state allow it to take publicly owned sand from North Inlet to renourish its beach. The colony's beach is private. Yet the colony's community association wants to mine 200,000 cubic yards of sand from the nearby inlet to shore up its beach for about five years.

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A Public Forum on Growth

Speaker: Waccamaw Neck growth should be directed Protect wetlands, ex-planner says

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Fire guts 100-year-old house

City fire investigators were trying to determine Tuesday if lightning was to blame for a Monday night fire that destroyed the law office of prominent environmental attorney Jimmy Chandler.

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Students mark law's anniversary

MURRELLS INLET — On the banks of Murrells Inlet, a handful of Georgetown students marked a national milestone and learned something about the health of their home turf.

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No groins on beach, court says

The S.C. Court of Appeals ruled that construction and reconstruction of beach groins is prohibited by state law.

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Nature's Guardian

Jimmy Chandler looks out over the live oaks draped with moss in his front yard at Pawleys Island on a Saturday morning and drinks in the sunshine.

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Waste dump closed

The Safety-Kleen hazardous waste landfill near the shore of Lake Marion will shut down Monday after a federal panel rejected the company's last-ditch attempt to stay open.

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